Hypothyroidism Webinar Part 2

Hypothyroidism Webinar Part 2Webinar Recording: A Functional Approach to Hypothyroidism – Part 2 of 3

 

Listen to/watch the recording below and download the slides by clicking here!

 

Topics Covered:

In part 2 of this 3-part series, Jim Paoletti provides Functional Medicine hypothyroidism assessment and treatment strategies that you can bring into your practice and use immediately.

  • The causes of poor conversion of fT4 to the active fT3
  • Treatment options for poor converters
  • Causes and Functional treatment options for hypometabolism
  • Q&A

 

Miss parts 1 and 3? Click the links below to watch!

PART 1    PART 3

 

About the Presenter:

Jim Paoletti, Dir of Education

Jim Paoletti, BS Pharmacy, FAARFM, FIACP, is the Director of Education at Power2Practice and a Clinical Consultant with over 30 years of experience creating and using bio-identical hormone therapies in both retail pharmacy and clinical practice.

Jim is a Diplomat in Functional Medicine in addition to being a former faculty member for the Fellowship of Functional Medicine.

At Power2Practice, he applies his wealth of knowledge and experience by hosting live webinars and creating useful content, such as blogs, podcasts and clinical support tools.

Brought to You by Power2Practice — The first EMR, business development platform and advanced patient portal designed for Integrative, Anti-Aging and Functional Medicine practices.

 

Webinar Recorded: July 13, 2016

 

Q&A:

Q:

I have a patient who has very closely followed the “Stop the Thyroid Madness” (STTM) protocols, and because of her, I have read some of that information.

My question is: STTM says that the free T3 to reverse T3 ratio should be 20:1 or better. I know you said that you do not check rT3 in general, but I wondered if you had an opinion regarding the fT3/rT3 ratio?

 

A:

The reason I do not use ratio numbers is because different labs use different processes for testing the hormones, and so the normal ranges are not always the same. If the numbers are different, the ratio will be different. So, I feel that when one expresses what a ratio should be, they need to specify the ranges of the labs that do their testing.

I prefer to attempt to get fT4 and fT3 within optimal, as close to midpoint as possible. If you correct any deficiencies or problems affecting the receptors (Vitamin D, Cortisol, ferritin and possibly iodine), then the patient will feel great.

That said, I do know a number of practitioners that do use the 20:1 ratio you mention and have fairly good success clinically–But only if they address the underlying issues that caused a high rT3 to fT3 in the first place.

 

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